When the Ford Model T was first introduced into society, it took 13 hours to build one car. A year later, Model T cars were being produced every 90 minutes. Over the fourteen years (1913 – 1927) that the Model T was made by Ford, over 15 million cars were produced. There were also eight predecessors to the Model T. Mr. Ford and his crew certainly learned from their daily experience to maximize their efficiency and productivity.

What are you learning from you every day “pieces” of experience?

In the psychological world, they say that adults undergo substantial changes about every seven to ten years. During early adulthood (in the 20s and 30s), there can be significant change and activity in external factors and relationships, such as attending college, joining the job force, getting married, and having children. The several next chapters in adulthood (during the 40s and 50s) often consist of maintaining these same roles in marriage, family, and work; however, despite a more smooth or controlled exterior, substantial and significant internal, personal shifts may be occurring.

“Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.” – Stephen Hawking

Without knowing or realizing that we are supposed to undergo periods of change and regrowth, we may not realize that these are signs we are changing, growing, and may need to address a new(er) you. Previous hobbies or interests may no longer be as fulfilling or fun. The spark in a romantic relationship may seem to all but fizzled out. Or sometimes, it may feel that we are suddenly sitting next to a stranger that was once our best friend and strongest ally. Our dream job may seem more like a living nightmare. In addition, finally having reached what we believed to be our greatest goals and aspirations, we find that experience of accomplishment quickly fades into a sense of emptiness and discouragement. It is also important to assess that these are signs of growth and not burnout, which is a sign of chronic stress (click here to take a Burnout Self-Test).

Leadership development is a step-by-step process that comes from realizing that everyday provides opportunities for you to grow wiser and stronger. Each and every day is an important puzzle piece in your evolution into a successful leader. You don’t think one single puzzle piece can play that big of role until it goes missing!

 


“Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.” – Stephen Hawking

Without knowing or realizing that we are supposed to undergo periods of change and regrowth, we may not realize that these are signs we are changing, growing, and may need to address a new(er) you. Previous hobbies or interests may no longer be as fulfilling or fun. The spark in a romantic relationship may seem to all but fizzled out. Or sometimes, it may feel that we are suddenly sitting next to a stranger that was once our best friend and strongest ally. Our dream job may seem more like a living nightmare. In addition, finally having reached what we believed to be our greatest goals and aspirations, we find that experience of accomplishment quickly fades into a sense of emptiness and discouragement. It is also important to assess that these are signs of growth and not burnout, which is a sign of chronic stress (click here to take a Burnout Self-Test).

Leadership development is a step-by-step process that comes from realizing that everyday provides opportunities for you to grow wiser and stronger. Each and every day is an important puzzle piece in your evolution into a successful leader. You don’t think one single puzzle piece can play that big of role until it goes missing!

ACTION TIME: Seeking Wisdom from Your Everyday Pieces of Experience

The art of living…is neither careless drifting on the one hand or fearful clinging to the past on the other. It consists in being sensitive to each moment, in regarding it as utterly new and unique, in having the mind open and wholly receptive.  – Alan Watts

Learning from the joys as well as the stumbling blocks can turn today’s thorns into tomorrow’s roses. Leaders are continually learning and growing. Remember Henry Ford and his persistent and continual focus on improving. What literally may take you hours today, may take you only seconds or minutes in the future.

 

Take a moment to reflect on this past year. Create the time and space to be interruption-free and write down events, experiences, activities that fall into these three categories:

  • Joy: Recall experiences that brought you joy, happiness, fulfillment, and note why they were positive?
  • Achievement(s): Acknowledge those goals and achievements you have reached so far in 2019. What emotion(s) are attached to them? You are a complex being and just like sweet and sour chicken, your life experiences can be a mixture of emotion, too!
  • Sorrows & Stumbling Blocks: Where have you been most challenged this past year? Again, answer why did they trigger this response? An important follow-up question, how did you respond to these experiences? Were they swept under the rug? Did you switch into super micromanager mode? Or were you able to ride the wave of ambiguity without becoming avoidant, fearful, or overly aggressive?

After completing this task, reflect on what your experiences so far this year and what you have learned from them. This can be a paragraph or one or two words, unfiltered and without worry about spelling or grammar. Are there particular themes that continue to reappear? Taking the time to engage in a period of reflection, contemplation, and learning is critical for moving forward. It allows you to develop into a more knowledgeable, more confident, and more astute leader. This is also something that you might want to share with your coach or consultant to further explore your personal and professional growth as well as receive support and guidance to help get past challenges or barriers.

Henry Ford did not accept that it was always going to take 13 hours to build a single Model T car. Every day, Mr. Ford was learning new ways to improve and, eventually, with time, energy, and focus, was producing over a million cars a year. Leaders develop similarly through continual reflection and embracing new learning opportunities to successfully adapt to a new and ever-changing world.

 “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” – Benjamin Franklin

Nicole Pacheco, President/Owner of Professional Edge, helps professionals develop and hone his or her leadership skills and talents.  

 

Want to learn how learn how Professional Edge can help you reach your full potential?

Contact performance consultant, Nicole Pacheco, to schedule your free consultation now!
Email nicole@professionaledge.co or call (217) 523-3143.